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History of Psychology: Online Texts

Online Texts

Classics in the History of Psychology
(psychclassics.yorku.ca/)
•Christopher D. Green, Ph.D., York University, is the project editor. See also the accompanying sites, Green's Links to Other On-Line Documents Related to the History of Psychology (psyclassics.yorku.ca/links.htm) and Classics Special Collections (psychclassics.yorku.ca/Special/), which consists of topic document sets. These are must-see resources. All documents reside in the public domain.

Dictionary of Philosophy of Mind (PoM)
(philosophy.uwaterloo.ca/MindDict/)
•Scholarly online resource featuring peer-reviewed articles. Edited by Chris Eliasmith of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

The Mead Project 2.0: Foundational Documents in Sociological Social Psychology
(www.brocku.ca/MeadProject/)
•Provides access to foundational documents of Mead and others related to his work (e.g., William Isaac Thomas and Floyd Henry Allport). A feature of the site, Mead Project Inventory, is Project Inventory Arranged by Author (www.brocku.ca/MeadProject/inventory5.html), intended to provide context for Mead's own work. Compiled and maintained by members of the Department of Sociology, St. Catherines, Ontario, Canada.

The History of Phrenology on the Web
(www.webarchive.org.uk/pan/11656/20050419/pages.britishlibrary.net/phrenology/index.html)
•Billed as the most comprehensive Web site on phrenology; includes many e-texts. No longer available but archived as of April 18. 2005. Created by John van Wyhe, Ph.D., Department of History & Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge.
Notes: Harvard University's Countaway Library of Medicine is a repository of the history of the phrenology movement; see the Web exhibit Talking Heads (https://www.countway.harvard.edu/chm/rarebooks/exhibits/talking_heads/index.html).
See also Van den Bossche Peter's Phrenology site (134.184.33.110/phreno/index.html), which espouses the view that phrenology still is useful.

Links to Primary Source E-Texts on the Web
(www.usca.edu/psychology/history/histor~1.html)
•Identifies Web-based psychological literature while setting the cultural context for their emergence. A nice supplement to Green's Classics in the History of Psychology site. Compiled and maintained by William J. House, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, University of South Carolina-Aiken.

Resources on the History of Idiocy
(www.personal.dundee.ac.uk/~mksimpso/)
•Features e-texts and links to e-texts, as well as a lengthy bibliography. Compiled and maintained by Murray K. Simpson, Ph.D., Department of Social Work, University of Dundee.