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Vegetarianism

Definition

Vegetarianism: Having one’s food source be primarily of plant origin, for health, ethical, moral, religious, ecological or economic reasons. There are three types of vegetarians: ovo-lactovegetarians, who do not eat meat but use milk, milk products, and eggs; lactovegetarians, who consume milk products but no meat or eggs; vegans, or pure vegetarians, who avoid all animal foods in any form. (Prentice-Hall Dictionary of Nutrition and Health)

Overview Resources

As you begin your research, you can use these resources to find background information.

Narrow the Topic

There are many ways to narrow your focus as you investigate vegetarianism. Some possible things to think about include:

  • What are the ecological concerns about livestock production and meat consumption?
  • What is the impact on one's health and nutrition of meat and dairy consumption?
  • Does adopting a vegetarian diet have any implications for the global food supply and the problem of hunger?
  • What are livestock factories and are they inhumane?
  • Do humans have an ethical obligation to animals?
  • What factors need to be considered when changing to a vegetarian life style?
  • How does vegetarianism intersect with feminism?